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Daily Archives: December 2, 2013

A male Yellow-bellied Sapsucker that was at the family farm, an interesting woodpecker to say at least. It will drill horizontal rows of holes in trunks of many different species of trees. When it finds an abundant sap flow, it will drill vertical rows of holes to take advantage of it. It then will return repeatedly to take drink of sap from the holes. Other birds may also come to drink the sap too, such as the titmice, nuthatches, and hummingbirds. The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker will also catch insects on the wing and on the ground. It will also eat fruit and berries as well. The male has the red patch on its head and chin and the female only has the patch on the top of its head. The bird is about 8" inches in length, and both birds have black-and-white-streaked-faces. Elongated white patches on they're shoulders on black wings. Black and white patches on its back and part-shell sides.The central belly is a yellowish or tannish in color. It ranges all of the East Coast from Florida on up into the upper regions of Canada. West from Mexico and Texas up through the middle state up to Minnesota and up into Canada. The only place it is on the west coast is in Alaska. (Stokes Field Guide To Birds, Eastern Region 1996) yellow-bellied sapsucker012 Here he had drilled a hole high up in the tree that he kept coming back to for sap.